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Miscanthus Morning Light
  • Miscanthus Morning Light is a fine textured hardy ornamental grass
  • Miscanthus Morning Light is a drought and deer proof low mainitenance perennial
Refined & Elegant!

Miscanthus Morning Light

Ornamental Grass with 9+ months of interest!
Item: #MISML1Q
ZONE 5,6,7,8,9
As low as $12.19
  • Unbeatable soft silvery foliage
  • Long lived & easy to grow
  • Happy in heat and drought
  • Refined 4' Hedge Plant
  • Pairs well with silver and white plants
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Miscanthus Morning Light Description

Morning Light Miscanthus is a welcomed addition to any perennial garden as it sets the standard for a refined & stunning look in the landscape.

Delicate, vertical stripes of a pristine white grace the narrow blades on well-behaved & brilliant-looking clumps.  

A compact ornamental grass, Morning Light grows to 4' tall and 3' wide without ever becoming a nuisance. The size of this colorful garden plant makes it a perfect choice for creating a mid-sized hedge plant.

Foliage remains colorful for nearly 9 months, and is topped with light pink flower stems in mid summer.

Keep the foliage on your Morning Light Miscanthus throughout the winter to enjoy its architectural effect with snow! Trim back to the ground in early spring before new growth begins.

Miscanthus Morning Light combines with other late blooming Sedums, colorful new Coneflowers,  and giant-flowering Hydrangeas.

Special Features: Cut Flower, Deer Resistant, Dried Flower, Drought Tolerant, Easy Care, Fall Color, Heat Tolerant, Long Blooming, Multi-seasonal Interest, Season Extender, Winter Interest

Quick Facts

  • Botanical Name:
    Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light'
  • Common Name:
    Ornamental Grass
  • Zone:
    5,6,7,8,9,
  • Sun Exposure:
    Sun
  • Delivery:
    See schedule
  • Ship Form:
    1 Quart
  • Soil Type:
    Normal, Sandy
  • Soil Moisture:
    Average, Dry
  • Height x Width:
    40" X 36"
  • Flower Color:
    Tan
  • Foliage Color:
    Variegated
  • Bloom Season:
    Mid Summer
  • Uses:
    Background, Border, Cottage Gardening, Foundation Planting, Massing, Specimen
  • Cannot Ship to:
    AK,CAN,HI,PR,OR
  • Patent #: None

Ideas and How-to's

SUGGESTED PRODUCTS

PLANTING GUIDE

Soil: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil. Tolerant of a wide range of soils from well-drained sandy soils to the heavy clay.
Light: Best in full sun. Less vigorous with decreased flowering, and tendency to flop in too much shade. Tolerant of summer heat and humidity.
Water: Medium -- Prefers moist soils, but once established, it's drought tolerant.
Spacing: 3 - 4 ft.
Fertilizing: Small amounts of fertilizer are needed for ornamental grasses. Too much fertilizer will increase the nitrogen level, and that can lead to lodging or flopping over. The best time for applying fertilizer is in the spring, just as growth is resuming. About one -quarter cup, per item, of a 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer is enough to take care of the plant needs throughout the entire summer. For best results, make sure you thoroughly water in the fertilizer.
Winterizing: Foliage should be left standing throughout the winter for visual interest, and to provide protection for the crowns.
Maintenance & Pruning: Cut foliage to a 6 to 12-inch-tall mound of stubble in late winter before new shoots appear. Older clumps tend to die in the center, leading to an unattractive shape and appearance. Frequency of division depends on species, soil fertility and exposure, but dividing every third year is a safe rule of thumb for most species. This should be done in late fall or early spring when the plant is dormant.

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